Feminists believe in gender equality and the deconstruction of the patriarchy.

Humanists believe in critical thinking and the agency of humans free of fate.

Equalists believe in a world without benders and the defeat of the Avatar.

actresssinger7:

A Masterclass in Acting: A Novel by Tatiana Maslany

(Source: in-hell-with-a-dead-girl-walking)

nubbsgalore:

honduran white tent bats roosting under a heliconia leaf, which they sever down the length of its midrib to create a ‘tent’ that provides a waterproof shelter and protection from potential predators. 

shybooklover:

You’ll never hate the Percy Jackson movies like Rick Riordan hates them

schazam:

i-think-im-so-funny:

This is so true it’s not even funny.

schazam:

i-think-im-so-funny:

This is so true it’s not even funny.

bluandorange asked: kataang or hiccstrid

(Source: penguinsledding)

onceuponymous:

I’m laughing so hard because Artemis is a Greek goddess of, among other things, maidenhood and archery.  She is literally an aro/ace arrow ace.

bpod-mrc:

25 July 2014
The X File
This deceptively simple image revolutionised molecular biology. It also represents one of the most notorious controversies in science. ‘Photo 51’ was taken by Rosalind Franklin, who was born on this day in 1920. It is an x-ray crystallography image of DNA, created by bombarding a tiny DNA sample with x-rays for more than 60 hours. To most of us, this striped cross might not mean much, but to a few scientists in 1953 it held the secret to the structure of DNA. The controversy surrounds the instant Maurice Wilkins, who worked in Franklin’s lab, showed the photo to Francis Crick, a molecular biologist at Cambridge University, without Franklin’s knowledge. Crick published a paper with his colleague James Watson describing DNA’s double-helix structure. Wilkins, Crick and Watson shared the Nobel Prize in 1962. Franklin, whose peers never accepted her, died of cancer four years earlier, and couldn’t receive the prize posthumously.
Written by Nick Kennedy
—
Image by Rosalind Franklin and Raymond GoslinCopyright held by Oregon State University Libraries
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

25 July 2014

The X File

This deceptively simple image revolutionised molecular biology. It also represents one of the most notorious controversies in science. ‘Photo 51’ was taken by Rosalind Franklin, who was born on this day in 1920. It is an x-ray crystallography image of DNA, created by bombarding a tiny DNA sample with x-rays for more than 60 hours. To most of us, this striped cross might not mean much, but to a few scientists in 1953 it held the secret to the structure of DNA. The controversy surrounds the instant Maurice Wilkins, who worked in Franklin’s lab, showed the photo to Francis Crick, a molecular biologist at Cambridge University, without Franklin’s knowledge. Crick published a paper with his colleague James Watson describing DNA’s double-helix structure. Wilkins, Crick and Watson shared the Nobel Prize in 1962. Franklin, whose peers never accepted her, died of cancer four years earlier, and couldn’t receive the prize posthumously.

Written by Nick Kennedy

Image by Rosalind Franklin and Raymond Goslin
Copyright held by Oregon State University Libraries

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook